Onba Factory & My Onba

Here is the third (and last, at least until my next trip to Ogijima) installment of my short series of articles about the Onba Factory, my favorite art site from the Setouchi International Art Festival.

In case you’ve missed them, you can find the first two parts there and there.

For this third part I am going to tell you about the My Onba, although there isn’t much I haven’t already told you in the previous parts, when it comes to them.

 

Onba Wall

“My Onba” photos and sketches in the Onba Factory’s main building

 

Ogijima woman with her "My Onba"

 

So just a quick reminder: The My Onba are Onba that belong to the people of Ogijima (mostly old ladies, apparently men don’t really use Onba if I understood correctly) and that have been transformed into art by the Onba Factory artists with the collaboration of the Onba‘s owner, made from parts of the original Onba and new parts that have been added to it, replacing or not older parts. The result being original, unique and beautiful new Onba that one can find a little bit everywhere on the island (Yoshifumi Ōshima informed us that they made about 30 of them and that was in October, expect a few more currently). I already have said all the good things I think about the idea and the project that will continue to have a positive impact on the island and its people long after the Festival.

I don’t have much to add, so I’ll just share a few of the My Onba I’ve found in the streets of Ogichō.

 

My Onba

The very first “My Onba” I stumbled upon in the streets of Ogi-chō

 

Post Office's My Onba

Even Ogijima’s Post Office Lady has her own My Onba

 

Post Office My Onba in Takamatsu

I ran into it again a few days later in Takamatsu’s Sunport (carrying the mail for Ogijima)

 

My Onba in Toyotama-hime Jinja

This one had been temporarily abandoned in the Toyotama-hime shrine.

 

"My Onba" in the streets of Ogijima

David Billa

David was born and raised in France. After a few years in the US and then back to his home country, life led him to the shores of the Seto Inland Sea in Japan. After falling in love with the area, he decided to show its beauty and all it has to offer with this blog.

2 Responses

  1. Renee says:

    This is actually pretty cool. I could certainly use it in my garden when I have to haul compost, plants and heaven knows what else. Thanks for sharing!

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